Autonomous police cars, codeless AI and the rise of self driving car lawsuits — This Week’s 10 Reads from a Chief Innovation Officer

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I read over 100 articles this week so you don’t have to — Here are the top 10 you should read over the weekend and why they matter for the public sector. Let’s dive in to this week’s reads —

The Articles —

Out of over 100 articles, here are the top 10 that stood out this week:

🚔 Ford Has An Idea For An Autonomous Police Car http://bit.ly/2EaaPJK

✏️ Windows 10’s new app: @Microsoft’s Ink to Code turns sketches into working code http://zd.net/2nfDy7y

🤖 Every study we could find on what automation will do to jobs, in one chart http://bit.ly/2DE5Gbr

📱 Your new car will have apps instead of options http://bit.ly/2DCVwrO

😈 You can expect surreptitious cryptocurrency mining to join ransomware as a big threat this year. http://bit.ly/2BzeQo2

🏍 A motorcyclist is suing GM after crashing into its self-driving car http://bit.ly/2GmzfjK

📉 The era of the cloud’s total dominance is drawing to a close http://econ.st/2n00fwE

⚡️ It’s Time for Electric Companies to Pivot http://bit.ly/2mZYNuc

💵 The battle for consumers gets physical (instead of virtual) http://tcrn.ch/2neUtXQ

💻 This Is The World’s First Graphical AI Interface http://bit.ly/2Ebbn1G

The Bottom Line —

Just in case you don’t have time to read each article, here are the key takeaways and why each one matters for government:

🚔 Ford Motor Company Has An Idea For An Autonomous Police Car http://bit.ly/2EaaPJK

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Although not all patents are commercialized, they are a great way to look at a company’s vision and strategy for making sense of the future. Ford’s patent of an autonomous police paints one picture of the future of public safety in a world full of autonomous vehicles. The most interesting aspect of the patent is not the self-driving component, but how they handle the process of issuing a citation in the future — and it doesn’t require you to stop. The process is similar to running a red light camera, except you don’t have to wait for the ticket in the mail — it’s automatically issued and potentially paid by the vehicle on behalf of the occupant. For government agencies, this can be a force multiplier and as Bill Schrier points out in his tweet, maybe a good use-case for the nationwide FirstNet network.

✏️ Windows 10’s new app: Microsofts’s Ink to Code turns sketches into working code http://zd.net/2nfDy7y

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Today, you must possess knowledge of a software programming language in order to build any new software programs. But this is no longer going to be the norm — in fact, even Wired called coding the next potential blue-collar job. This new technology from Microsoft validates a growing shift in how we create technology, one in which there are little to no barriers to creating new digital experiences. For government, this can unlock new possibilities from existing employees to design better experiences without having to learn a programming language. It’s important to remember that as technology creation has become democratized, constituents will have the ability to create technology (and will increasingly do so) to solve issues that will touch government. This will create an opportunity for government agencies to embrace the cognitive surplus of people to become more effective — or be disrupted by it.

🤖 Every study we could find on what automation will do to jobs, in one chart http://bit.ly/2DE5Gbr

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: There are many perspectives in the market about how automation and artificial intelligence will impact jobs. Our fascination with automation and its impact even led the BBC to create a search engine to see when your job will be replaced by technology. Unfortunately, all of these studies and reports have widely differing opinions on this topic, which is why this article was a fascinating way to see all the major perspectives in one table. For government agencies, the lesson here is that we really don’t know the full impact automation will have on the workforce, but we know it will undeniably have a major impact. The important thing for agencies to do is to continue to follow the conversations and market research on this topic, as well as watching how automation impacts the private-sector.

📱 Your new car will have apps instead of options http://bit.ly/2DCVwrO

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: When you purchase a vehicle, you’re normally stuck with the factory packages you get — unless you do aftermarket upgrades, which can be expensive and require your vehicle to be out of commission as they are physically installed. This is all beginning to change. When you picture the rise of car apps, you may think of an app store on your car entertainment system that lets you stream music from Spotify or NPR, but it’s actually so much more than that today. Tesla gave us a first look at how software updates can unlock new functions with existing hardware, and many automakers are working on leveraging this same model to enable consumers to purchase subscriptions or packages that upgrade car functions — after they’ve purchased their vehicles. For government agencies, it’s important to remember that Tesla’s over-the-air update gave all their Model S vehicles self-driving capabilities overnight with no government approvals or involvement. Government agencies will need to be prepared for this happening more often and adjust the ways they regulate in this new era.

😈 You can expect surreptitious cryptocurrency mining to join ransomware as a big threat this year. http://bit.ly/2BzeQo2

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: In the most recent study from the Online Trust Alliance, the number of cybersecurity incidents doubled in 2017 — continuing a multi-year trend of exponential growth. For government agencies, the study indicates you can expect to see this same trend in 2018 as well as the rise of new threat vectors, such as cryptojacking. This changing landscape will lead to major infrastructure shifts in government, but it also will require a shift from an application-centric cybersecurity approach to one focused on enterprise risk management.

🏍 A motorcyclist is suing GM after crashing into its self-driving car http://bit.ly/2GmzfjK

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: If you get into an accident today, understanding who’s responsible is fairly straightforward — it’s either you or the other party. On rare occasions, there are vehicle flaws that will shift the liability to the car manufacturer, but even with that, there’s plenty of case law with how those situations will most likely be resolved. Enter self-driving cars and a new lawsuit that is forcing a conversation around who is liable when a self-driving car makes a mistake. Although self-driving vehicles are still produced by a major manufacturer, they are enabled by many other layers of technology not directly controlled by the manufacturer. Comet Labs created a graphic (below) to illustrate the over 263 companies tackling different parts of the self-driving vehicle market — from software to physical sensors. The key takeaway for government is that we are entering an era where countless lawsuits will seek to determine who’s ultimately responsible when autonomous systems make mistakes— and government agencies (especially cities) will find themselves increasingly named in these new lawsuits as they continue to focus on smart transportation systems.

📉 The era of the cloud’s total dominance is drawing to a close http://econ.st/2n00fwE

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: There a major shifts happening to how large-scale systems are architected — and many of the new changes are happening at the edge. This doesn’t mean that cloud systems are going to decline, it means that cloud systems are going to evolve to also do processing at the edge of networks. Think about a city with thousands of smart streetlights all embedded with environmental sensors and connectivity. It would not make sense to have this data all aggregated and centrally processed, rather initial processing can happen at the edge by individual lights or in groups of lights. For government agencies, putting processing power at the edge increases the resiliency and speed of the network, but also raises cybersecurity risks that must be mitigated — because that network of streetlights could be hacked or become a gateway to critical infrastructure hacks.

Read the full article on Medium.