The rise of AI operators, dynamic parking meters and Amazon Echo as a crime fighter— This Week’s 10 Reads from a Chief Innovation Officer

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I read over 100 articles this week so you don’t have to — Here are the top 10 you should read over the weekend and why they matter for the public sector. Let’s dive in to this week’s —

The Articles —

Out of over 100 articles, here are the top 10 that stood out this week:

👩‍💻 AI operators will play a critical role as bots redefine the workplace http://bit.ly/2lvj4aa

🇪🇪 Estonia, the Digital Republic http://bit.ly/2lFSaNU

📊 New Metrics for the Algorithmic Enterprise — http://bit.ly/2DReOtc

⚖️ Innovating Regulation http://bit.ly/2lYv7Nm

👿 The nasty surprises hackers have in store for us in 2018 http://bit.ly/2DNXkxA

🚔 UK police turn to Amazon Echo in the fight against crime | http://zd.net/2ESPcNF

💡 We Need Large Innovations — Vinod Khosla http://bit.ly/2CI4cgM

🙀 Saudi Aramco execs see Uber as a bigger threat to oil demand than Tesla http://read.bi/2DUeklY

💸 San Francisco Rolls Out Dynamic Parking Rate Model http://bit.ly/2E7c5fp

🗣 Google’s New Text-to-Speech AI Is so Good We Bet You Can’t Tell It From a Real Human http://on.inc.com/2lyrU79

The Bottom Line —

Just in case you don’t have time to read each article, here are the key takeaways and why each one matters for government:

👩‍💻 AI operators will play a critical role as bots redefine the workplace http://bit.ly/2lvj4aa

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: As artificial intelligence enters the enterprise, it will not lead the the immediate replacement of jobs; rather, it will augment existing job functions and create a new opportunity for impacted employees to help train the software and hardware (thus giving rise to AI operators). AI operators won’t need to be skilled in machine learning, they’ll just need to operate as an intermediary that helps train and coach new enterprise software and hardware on the job at hand. I see this especially impacting cybersecurity as most cybersecurity functions will be replaced by AI, yet still coached by a human. For example, in the future your Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) could be replaced by AI and shift the existing human talent to the job of a risk mitigation officer — someone who helps orchestrate the AIs to mitigate risks. Don’t believe me, the City of Long Beach, California is already working on this.

🇪🇪 Estonia, the Digital Republic http://bit.ly/2lFSaNU

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Although Estonia has a small population of roughly 1.3 million people, it has become a shining example of a national government embracing next-generation technology to increase efficiency (and economic development). From a blockchain-based e-residency program to the first national election held on the Internet — Estonia provides a glimpse of what’s possible when a government agencies anticipates change instead of being disrupted by it.

📊 New Metrics for the Algorithmic Enterprise —  http://bit.ly/2DReOtc

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: As functions of government service delivery become augmented or replaced by algorithms, it will be important for agencies to incorporate new metrics to understand their internal and external impact. Algorithmic delivery systems will enable government to be more effective and responsive, but it will require us to rethink the landscape of how we measure performance to ensure the new technologies we leverage are creating the desired impact we envisioned. 

⚖️ Innovating Regulation http://bit.ly/2lYv7Nm

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: The exponential era we live in has given rise to many new business models, like Uber and Lyft, that run up against the existing regulatory structure put in place by government. These disruptive business models are emerging more frequently, requiring government agencies to rapidly respond or challenge a company’s ability to operate. It was time for a new way of thinking on government regulations, so I was encourage to see the Aspen Institute’s Center for Urban Innovation put out new strategies to help government rethink regulations across food, permitting, transportation and procurement. I encourage you to check it out and my hope is that government agencies can begin to share and build on these strategies collectively. 

👿 The nasty surprises hackers have in store for us in 2018 http://bit.ly/2DNXkxA

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This article is a good reminder that the cybersecurity landscape is a constantly moving target and evolving threat landscape — and 2018 is going to have some nasty surprises for government. For example, in 2017 ransomware impacted agencies across the country, but one of the predictions in this article is that ransomware is going to the cloud — which creates new challenges in response and most agencies disaster recovery plans. I encourage all government agencies to think through the 5 other cybersecurity predictions and how they might respond as things start to heat up in 2018.

🚔 UK police turn to Amazon Echo in the fight against crime | http://zd.net/2ESPcNF

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This article provided an interesting look at how one UK city is looking at using an Amazon Echo has a crime fighting tool — specifically around crime and missing person bulletins but also looking to new ways to make data and emergency services accessible through voice. Proactive information delivery (versus having to ask Alexa for information) is something that would make this even more useful, and Amazon is already enabling it for certain skills. This is just the start, I can also imagine a day where gunshot detection, like ShotSpotter, may just be a passively crowdsource skill that citizens opt-into on their device. Going forward, government agencies should continue to explore ways to leverage these smart speakers, while balancing privacy concerns, as a potential to increase their accessibility and effectiveness for constituents. 

💡 We Need Large Innovations — Vinod Khosla http://bit.ly/2CI4cgM

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This was a fitting read for going into a new year — and my takeaway for government after reading this article is that it’s time to start looking a ways to fundamentally reinvent certain models of government service delivery. Government is getting good at incremental innovation and performance improvements, but what about creating new models altogether? My hope for agencies is that in addition to their existing innovation work, they will look to having 5–10% of their innovation portfolio focused on new model experimentation. A good starting point for interested agencies is Zero to One, by Peter Thiel

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