Drones that respond to gunshots, AI-summarized privacy policies and the truth about hierarchy and innovation — This Week’s 10 Reads from a Chief Innovation Officer

drone-2554178_1920.jpg

I read over 100 articles this week so you don’t have to — Here are the top 10 you should read over the weekend and why they matter for the public sector. Let’s dive in to this week’s reads —

The Articles —

Out of over 100 articles, here are the top 10 that stood out this week:

🌆 Louisville Plans to Become First U.S. City to Use Drones to Respond to Gunshots http://bit.ly/2F8pZj1

💡 There Are Changes Bigger Than Self-Driving Cars Coming http://bit.ly/2HsfAzi

🤖 How Should Your Company Prepare For Robot Coworkers? http://bit.ly/2Et6sJ6

🔍 An AI That Reads & Recaps Privacy Policies So That You Don’t Have To http://bit.ly/2EUNwUk

😲 73 Mind-Blowing Implications of a Driverless Future bit.ly/2skxOiY

📄 How AI Is Changing Contracts http://bit.ly/2ogp9bY

🚲 Lyft is teaming up with Baltimore’s bike-share system http://bit.ly/2odq4Kn

🚨 ‘Cryptojackers’ Hit Government Websites: A New Flavor of Hacking, Courtesy of Third-Party Code http://bit.ly/2Hq2brx

⚠️ AI cyberattacks will be almost impossible for humans to stop http://bit.ly/2sqpqOI

💼 The Truth About Hierarchy: A growing body of research shows that the right kind of hierarchy can help teams become better innovators and learners. http://bit.ly/2o9SdCJ

The Bottom Line —

Just in case you don’t have time to read each article, here are the key takeaways and why each one matters for government:

🌆 Louisville Plans to Become First U.S. City to Use Drones to Respond to Gunshots http://bit.ly/2F8pZj1

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: The City of Louisville, Kentucky — known for bourbonism and its recognized performance and innovation programs — is now looking at testing a new innovative concept involving drones. Today, Louisville uses ShotSpotter, a technology that provides real-time gunshot detection through acoustic sensors and AI, but it can still take minutes for a police officer to respond to the detected gunshot location. Enter drones. Louisville plans to tie their ShotSpotter technology to a drone response unit, enabling them to be on-scene and collecting information much quicker, which also provides critical intelligence back to first responders before they arrive on the scene. For government agencies, this is an early look at one of the many public safety drone use-cases that can be a force-multiplier and lifesaver — expect to see much more in the coming years.

💡 There Are Changes Bigger Than Self-Driving Cars Coming http://bit.ly/2HsfAzi

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This was a great opinion piece that brings to the surface why autonomous vehicles are not the biggest change we should be focusing on— because e-commerce and job automation are already creating major impacts in cities today. For government agencies that look to plan for the future, it’s easy to get caught up in the shiny objects of the day (and there are some cool shiny objects I must admit), but we must not lose sight of other important shifts that are happening right in front of us.

🤖 How Should Your Company Prepare For Robot Coworkers? http://bit.ly/2Et6sJ6

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: We’ve been talking about artificial intelligence, machine learning and robotics for many weeks now, but it’s time to get more practical about how we prepare our workplace and workforce for the realities at hand. For government agencies, jobs will not be replaced but more likely augmented by technology to start, so we must be able to adapt and restructure existing workflows over time. This biggest takeaway for me from this read is that we need to begin to have a human resources-oriented conversation in government about how best to approach technological disruption. Many HR departments are ahead of the game on using AI for recruiting and onboarding, but the way we adapt and optimize the existing workforce continues to be a challenge.

🔍 An AI That Reads & Recaps Privacy Policies So That You Don’t Have To http://bit.ly/2EUNwUk

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: When you download a new app or sign-up for a new online service, you’re always presented with a terms of service page. Most of us just click ‘accept’ without reading, because we trade convenience (accessing the app right away) for rights to our data or future legal recourse (the fine print). As a result, someone created an AI bot and browser extension called Polisis, to auto-summarize terms of use in a visual and easy to understand way — plus you can even ask questions about the terms just like your chatting with your attorney. For government agencies, I believe this is a great look at how we should repackage our city ordinances and state laws. Government rules and regulations will always be lengthy in nature, but that doesn’t mean that we can apply a better experience to enable constituents to better understand it.

😲 73 Mind-Blowing Implications of a Driverless Future bit.ly/2skxOiY

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: It seems like each week, I’ve read an article with an interesting perspective about a driverless future that has caught my attention — this week it was an article with 73 perspectives about the coming driverless future. Although I don’t agree with all of them, it is helpful to read opposing views because it challenges and/or validates your own assumptions about the future. One of the 73 that stood out was: “Driver’s licenses will slowly go away as will the Department of Motor Vehicles in most states. Other forms of ID may emerge as people no longer carry driver’s licenses. This will probably correspond with the inevitable digitization of all personal identification — via prints, retina scans or other biometric scanning.” For government agencies, I encourage you to continue to read different perspectives about the future across a variety of disciplines of because in doing so, it forces you to think exponentially.

📄 How AI Is Changing Contracts http://bit.ly/2ogp9bY

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This was a fascinating look at the eventual rise of AI contracting, essentially applying artificial intelligence to contract management software. Government agencies execute 1,000s of contracts a year and applying machine learning to a structured set of contracts could unlock a multitude of use-cases for analysis and management — plus it could even enable them to be stored on a decentralized system like the blockchain. For government agencies, this functionality will be ushered in through an existing contract management platform but keep in mind — in order to get the most out of it, your contracts will need an intelligent structure that can be used to train the software to analyze and manage contracts going forward.

🚲 Lyft is teaming up with Baltimore’s bike-share system http://bit.ly/2odq4Kn

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Mobility and smart transportation are major focus areas for government agencies today. Many existing public transit systems have been disrupted by changes in behavior or the rise of new models of mobility, like Uber and Lyft. In this new era, smarter transit does not mean going at it alone — government agencies must partner with private sector companies to create interconnected transit systems. What Lyft is doing in Baltimore is a great example of building a networked ecosystem with transit. For government agencies, it’s important to remember that you will play an important foundation and catalyst for these collaborations to happen. The World Economic Forum recently put out a report on Designing a Seamless Integrated Mobility System [PDF] that validates the network model Baltimore is starting with bike-sharing and ride-sharing.

Read the full article on Medium.