Machines learning from machines, strategies for upskilling employees and the race for augmented reality (AR) glasses — This Week’s 10 Reads from a Chief Innovation Officer

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I read over 100 articles this week so you don’t have to — Here are the top 10 you should read over the weekend and why they matter for the public sector. Let’s dive in to this week’s reads —

The Articles —

Out of over 100 articles, here are the top 10 that stood out this week:

👓 The Race for AR Glasses Starts Now http://bit.ly/2nluZs6

🏙 So Maybe Uber and Lyft Aren’t Ruining the American City http://bit.ly/2DPIqvk

⌚️A fast-evolving new botnet could take gadgets in your home to the dark side http://bit.ly/2Fwv2sn

✅ What Changes When AI Is So Accessible That Everyone Can Use It? http://bit.ly/2BFnkK8

🤖 As AI Makes More Decisions, the Nature of Leadership Will Change http://bit.ly/2GtdXkk

🚧 Why Companies Don’t Respond to Digital Disruption http://bit.ly/2EnDIlH

📈 Machines Teaching Each Other Could Be the Biggest Exponential Trend in AI http://bit.ly/2nESvk4

💡 Great insight report on a reskilling and upskilling strategies from the World Economic Forum http://bit.ly/2DHLqWz [PDF]

💰 Why a major cyber-attack could be as costly as a hurricane http://zd.net/2nnrEZv

👀 Your city is watching you — How machine learning and “computer vision” will transform our cities http://bit.ly/2EnXe1b

The Bottom Line —

Just in case you don’t have time to read each article, here are the key takeaways and why each one matters for government:

👓 The Race for AR Glasses Starts Now http://bit.ly/2nluZs6

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Augmented Reality (AR), which is technology that overlays — or augments — your live view through glasses or a headset, continues to grow as a focus area for many computer and mobile phone companies. Why is this? Some see AR as the eventual replacement of your mobile phone, but I tend to agree with TIME columnist, Tim Bajarin, who believes mobile phones, “will become even more essential to our daily lives in the future. Whether that tech stays in the rectangular-slate shape we know today or it morphs into some kind of wearable “brain,” the technical wizardry that powers today’s smartphones will evolve and make it possible to walk around and access information without ever needing to look at a screen.” For government agencies, AR will play a significant role in the frontlines of government operations, from first responders to utility workers, by providing employees a layer of situational awareness not possible through a mobile phone alone.

🏙 So Maybe Uber and Lyft Aren’t Ruining the American City http://bit.ly/2DPIqvk

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: As the title of this article implies, there’s a constant debate in government on whether ridesharing companies are adversely impacting our cities. Although the studies may sometimes be inconclusive, there is little doubt that ridesharing companies fill a gap in first and last-mile transportation options that are difficult, or incredibly expensive, for government agencies to do on their own. The opportunity for government agencies is to partner with ridesharing companies to make them an extension of your existing transportation systems similar to what Phoenix is doing with Lyft, which will provide a great foundation for the eventual automation coming to their fleets.

⌚️A fast-evolving new botnet could take gadgets in your home to the dark side http://bit.ly/2Fwv2sn

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Satori is the latest malware (evolved from a previous version) that is gaining traction by infecting consumer Internet-connected devices, such as your smart home thermostat, to become part of a botnet. What’s important to remember is that these consumer devices in volume can create havoc for government agencies. Imagine if the malware turned everyone’s connected thermostat down 20-degrees at the same time — lights out! Government agencies need to become more proactive in Internet of Things (IoT) standards and education down to the consumer level. Government agencies today don’t just need to worry about protecting their SCADA systems, they need to plan for and mitigate consumer IoT’s ability to disrupt mission-critical systems.

✅ What Changes When AI Is So Accessible That Everyone Can Use It? http://bit.ly/2BFnkK8

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Last week we read about the rise of the first graphic artificial intelligence (AI) system, and this article was a great follow-up by providing a look into companies that are trying to lower the barriers of using AI inside and outside of their organizations. For government agencies, realizing the full benefits of AI today requires an expertise that most agencies do not have in-house, but this is where technology can fill a gap. The author’s say it best, But what’s clear is that the democratization of AI is underway, and the competitive advantage could soon be shifting from those companies with advanced in-house AI expertise to those firms with the most innovative worker ideas for utilizing that technology.” Just replace company with government :)

🤖 As AI Makes More Decisions, the Nature of Leadership Will Change http://bit.ly/2GtdXkk

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Most articles you read about artificial intelligence (AI), discuss the impact it will have on jobs, skills and the future of work — but what about leadership? This read was a fascinating look a why AI will require leaders to develop new skills around the following domains:humility, adaptability, vision, and engagement. These also closely mirror my own observations on what I see as the next version of leadership — Leadership 2.0. For government leaders, the rise of AI cannot be simply managed as just another technology entering our organizations; rather, we must recognize that it requires a new way of thinking and leadership to realize all its benefit.

🚧 Why Companies Don’t Respond to Digital Disruption http://bit.ly/2EnDIlH

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Although this article was written for corporations to help them understand the importance and risk of inaction with digital technologies, there are also many parallels to that in government. The author makes the point that companies may not be responding because they don’t perceive the dangers posed to their organization by digital disruption,” which is also a good way to describe inaction in government agencies at times (as well as a lack of funding). For government agencies, it’s important to remember that even though you are government — you can be displaced and disrupted by digital technologies. For example, ridesharing companies, which are essentially facilitating a logistics technology, have already begun to have a major impact on mass transportation utilization. The question for government agencies is what are you doing daily to keep up with the pace of change? If you need a starting point, I’ve put together some recommendations on how to plan for exponential change.

📈 Machines Teaching Each Other Could Be the Biggest Exponential Trend in AI http://bit.ly/2nESvk4

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This was a fascinating read of an exponential trend we don’t often consider — machines teaching machines. Machine learning, a component of Artificial Intelligence (AI), is getting smarter and faster at learning without requiring much human input. The author points out how quickly Tesla’s Autopilot feature improves by leveraging — and learning from — the collective wisdom and human corrections of all Telsa vehicles on the road. When you apply this example to Internet-connected fleets, streetlights, and other technology government agencies oversee, machine learning will help us unlock insights and correlation we cannot begin to imagine.

💡 Great insight report on a reskilling and upskilling strategies from the World Economic Forumhttp://bit.ly/2DHLqWz [PDF]

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Thanks to exponential change, we know that the jobs we have today will look completely different in the next 5–10 years — the question is, what do we do about it? This report from the World Economic Forum and Boston Consulting Group, providing strategies on how to identify job transition and reskilling opportunities in the workforce (including an interesting look at some of the projected changes in job families by 2026). For government agencies, whether you’re an executive and frontline employee, it’s important to begin thinking and planning about how to respond to these exponential changes and their impact on the workforce. For those of you interested in diving deeper, there’s a report that ties to this on the Eight Futures of Work: Scenarios and their Implications, describing different visions of the future of work by 2030.

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