Algorithmic zoning, a deputized police chatbot and 10 breakthrough technologies to follow this year — This Week’s 10 Reads from a Chief Innovation Officer

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I read over 100 articles this week so you don’t have to — Here are the top 10 you should read over the weekend and why they matter for the public sector. Let’s dive into this week’s reads —

The Articles —

Out of over 100 articles, here are the top 10 that stood out this week:

🗺 Algorithmic zoning could be the answer to cheaper housing and more equitable cities http://bit.ly/2EPeYp7

🧠 Cognitive technologies: a technical primer http://bit.ly/2FvHUAs

🎧 How UPS delivers faster using $8 headphones and code that decides when dirty trucks get cleaned http://bit.ly/2GyePUc

📸 AI-Aided Cameras Mean No More Car Mirrors, No More Blind Spots http://bit.ly/2o8co44

❤️ Taiwan has figured out how to turn online disagreements into a positive political force http://bit.ly/2Fs0U2L

💡 Why Decentralization Matters http://bit.ly/2EPTkRm

🤖 Los Angeles Chatbot Deputized to Help with Police Recruitment http://bit.ly/2EHQ5IJ

9️⃣ The Nine Elements of Digital Transformation http://bit.ly/2oh2cp0

🚕 Autonomous Taxi Revenues: Who Will Reap the Profits from the Boom… http://bit.ly/2EQcN17

🔍 You’ll want to keep an eye on these 10 breakthrough technologies this year http://bit.ly/2FkrmLJ

The Bottom Line —

Just in case you don’t have time to read each article, here are the key takeaways and why each one matters for government:

🗺 Algorithmic zoning could be the answer to cheaper housing and more equitable cities http://bit.ly/2EPeYp7

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This was a fascinating read on something called algorithmic zoning — which is a shift from traditional rule-based models (think traditional zoning and land use plans) to “dynamic systems based on blockchains, machine learning algorithms, and spatial data.”Algorithmic zoning on a blockchain would rely on a type of token (similar to bitcoin) that would be used as a currency to incentivize or disincentivize price, utilization and more. For government, using algorithmic zoning could definitely lead to cheaper housing and more equitable cities — but there are challenges with the reality of rolling out such a system. For example, this system would require a critical mass of adoption (bitcoin is still only accepted a few businesses) in order to be useful or effective — and would run into the challenge of creating non-transferrable, silo’d incentive systems across different cities. Regardless of these, there are still elements of this idea that hold value for long-term consideration, such as taking a systems-driven approach to city management.

🧠 Cognitive technologies: a technical primer http://bit.ly/2FvHUAs

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This was a great breakdown of cognitive technologies today and what’s around the corner for them from Deloitte. A simple Google search will show you that there are countless definitions of cognitive technologies, but I find it best to think about them as a physical platform manifestation of artificial intelligence — meaning, cognitive technologies leverage artificial intelligence to augment or automate human intelligence and tasks.

Cognitive computing (CC) describes technology platforms that, broadly speaking, are based on the scientific disciplines of artificial intelligence and signal processing. (Wikipedia)

In the article, Deloitte outlined four specific categories of cognitive technologies being used today (also in the table below): Robert process automation (RPA), cognitive language technologies, cognitive machine learning, and cognitive computer vision. Each of these categories has the ability to significantly impact government, from automating back-end IT functions (robotic process automation) to making police body cameras a proactive tool to identify threats for officers (cognitive computer vision) — the use-cases are unlimited.

 

Deloitte Insights (2018)

For government agencies, this doesn’t mean you need to widely adopt cognitive technologies — rather, it’s important to understand the bigger picture of where the technology is today and what’s possible. By embracing cognitive technologies, you just might find an opportunity to become a cognitive government.

🎧 How UPS delivers faster using $8 headphones and code that decides when dirty trucks get cleaned http://bit.ly/2GyePUc

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This was a great read that gave a deep dive into UPS’s data science chops and more importantly, the significant impact of simple fixes. By applying $8 headphones to an existing process, UPS was able to save new recruits from memorizing hundreds of zip codes by audio telling them what conveyor belt to put packages on. Simple fix, major impact. For government agencies, this is a great reminder that as we begin to aggregate and warehouse more of our data — we need to find simple but impactful ways to put this data to work. And it just might be with a pair of $8 headphones.

📸 AI-Aided Cameras Mean No More Car Mirrors, No More Blind Spots http://bit.ly/2o8co44

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Last week, I shared a post about 73 Mind-Blowing Implications of Driverless Cars and Trucks, and here’s a new one for the list — no need for rear-view mirrors (or any mirrors). This may sound like a something decades away, but Japan already passed a law enabling mirrorless cars on their highways — today. For government agencies, AI blindspot detection and the rise of self-driving cars may lead to cars losing their mirrors — but think bigger picture — if you don’t need to see around your car, do we really need streetlights blanketing long stretches highways with artificial light? Exponential technologies and behavior change will inevitably lead to changes in the existing infrastructure we actually utilize going forward.

❤️ Taiwan has figured out how to turn online disagreements into a positive political force http://bit.ly/2Fs0U2L

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This was a fantastic read about how Taiwan took unstructured, online disagreements and applied a new technology to turn them into structured data that was much easier to understand and make decisions off of. The technology used, a US-startup called Pol.is, was created to bring “AI & machine learning to participatory democracy.” For government agencies, tools like this will become increasingly important as a way to crowdsource structured data (and eventually microtasks) from the general public today. Traditional social media platforms such as Facebook can amplify hyper-polarization of online dialogs, and don’t provide any actionable feedback — outside of sentiment through emojis 😡. It will be important for government agencies to be an active participant and facilitator of such tools, or they face being constantly disrupted by the collective energy of these groups.

💡 Why Decentralization Matters http://bit.ly/2EPTkRm

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This was a fascinating look at the role of decentralized systems today — and why they are going to be important platforms of the future. Most of us may have heard of decentralization as a model through the rise of the blockchain, but this is an early look at a future rise of decentralized networks, called cryptonetworks, which have the power to fundamentally reshape the Internet and traditional economic models as we know them.

Cryptonetworks are networks built on top of the internet that 1) use consensus mechanisms such as blockchains to maintain and update state, 2) use cryptocurrencies (coins/tokens) to incentivize consensus participants (miners/validators) and other network participants. (Chris Dixon)

For government, a decentralized future doesn’t have to mean the elimination of government as a middleman, but it does change the role that government and constituents have within a network.

🤖 Los Angeles Chatbot Deputized to Help with Police Recruitment http://bit.ly/2EHQ5IJ

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: We’ve seen many chatbot use-cases for government emerge over the years, but the City of Los Angeles use of Chip (now Officer Chip) is something you should follow. Chip launched last year to help answer questions for individuals interested in starting a business in L.A. through the Los Angeles Business Assistance Virtual Network (BAVN) but in its new role, is now helping answer questions for prospective police recruits.For government, my two main takeaways from this are:

  1. One brand —The City of Los Angeles was smart to keep the Chip name as they expand use-cases for it, thus helping build brand awareness with the public with each interaction. In the future, I can see there just being one Chip that can you can access on any city website that has the ability to interface and respond to any question, even if you’re not on the correct site.
  2. Automating Knowledge — I love the strategy L.A. is using with rolling out their chatbots, by tying them to structured knowledge repositories, it enables them to be accessible 24/7 and frees up valuable staff time spent answering repetitive questions.

In the future, I hope to see Chip expand to be accessible through text messages and other major platforms the population may frequent more than a city website.

9️⃣ The Nine Elements of Digital Transformation http://bit.ly/2oh2cp0

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This was a great read from MITSloan Mgmt Review that broke down nine elements of digital transformation in companies across three domains: customer experience, operational processes, and business models. For government agencies, we’ve seen year-over-year that constituents expect the same, if not better, service delivery in the public sector then what is received in the private sector [PDF]. Understand the trends and strategies for digital transformation in the private sector provides a great starting point for government agencies interested in doing the same.

🚕 Autonomous Taxi Revenues: Who Will Reap the Profits from the Boom… http://bit.ly/2EQcN17

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This was a great read leveraging research from ARK Invest regarding the anticipated economics of autonomous taxi revenues. ARK divides the autonomous taxi market into four types of providers: platform providers, lead generators, vehicle manufacturers, and owner/operators. The conclusion from their research is that Owner/Operators will receive the largest share of revenue per mile, yet this could be offset by the cost of ownership and maintenance. For government agencies, it’s important to follow the economic research of all autonomous technologies, because their rise will inevitably disrupt government revenues.

Read the full article on Medium

Drones that respond to gunshots, AI-summarized privacy policies and the truth about hierarchy and innovation — This Week’s 10 Reads from a Chief Innovation Officer

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I read over 100 articles this week so you don’t have to — Here are the top 10 you should read over the weekend and why they matter for the public sector. Let’s dive in to this week’s reads —

The Articles —

Out of over 100 articles, here are the top 10 that stood out this week:

🌆 Louisville Plans to Become First U.S. City to Use Drones to Respond to Gunshots http://bit.ly/2F8pZj1

💡 There Are Changes Bigger Than Self-Driving Cars Coming http://bit.ly/2HsfAzi

🤖 How Should Your Company Prepare For Robot Coworkers? http://bit.ly/2Et6sJ6

🔍 An AI That Reads & Recaps Privacy Policies So That You Don’t Have To http://bit.ly/2EUNwUk

😲 73 Mind-Blowing Implications of a Driverless Future bit.ly/2skxOiY

📄 How AI Is Changing Contracts http://bit.ly/2ogp9bY

🚲 Lyft is teaming up with Baltimore’s bike-share system http://bit.ly/2odq4Kn

🚨 ‘Cryptojackers’ Hit Government Websites: A New Flavor of Hacking, Courtesy of Third-Party Code http://bit.ly/2Hq2brx

⚠️ AI cyberattacks will be almost impossible for humans to stop http://bit.ly/2sqpqOI

💼 The Truth About Hierarchy: A growing body of research shows that the right kind of hierarchy can help teams become better innovators and learners. http://bit.ly/2o9SdCJ

The Bottom Line —

Just in case you don’t have time to read each article, here are the key takeaways and why each one matters for government:

🌆 Louisville Plans to Become First U.S. City to Use Drones to Respond to Gunshots http://bit.ly/2F8pZj1

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: The City of Louisville, Kentucky — known for bourbonism and its recognized performance and innovation programs — is now looking at testing a new innovative concept involving drones. Today, Louisville uses ShotSpotter, a technology that provides real-time gunshot detection through acoustic sensors and AI, but it can still take minutes for a police officer to respond to the detected gunshot location. Enter drones. Louisville plans to tie their ShotSpotter technology to a drone response unit, enabling them to be on-scene and collecting information much quicker, which also provides critical intelligence back to first responders before they arrive on the scene. For government agencies, this is an early look at one of the many public safety drone use-cases that can be a force-multiplier and lifesaver — expect to see much more in the coming years.

💡 There Are Changes Bigger Than Self-Driving Cars Coming http://bit.ly/2HsfAzi

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This was a great opinion piece that brings to the surface why autonomous vehicles are not the biggest change we should be focusing on— because e-commerce and job automation are already creating major impacts in cities today. For government agencies that look to plan for the future, it’s easy to get caught up in the shiny objects of the day (and there are some cool shiny objects I must admit), but we must not lose sight of other important shifts that are happening right in front of us.

🤖 How Should Your Company Prepare For Robot Coworkers? http://bit.ly/2Et6sJ6

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: We’ve been talking about artificial intelligence, machine learning and robotics for many weeks now, but it’s time to get more practical about how we prepare our workplace and workforce for the realities at hand. For government agencies, jobs will not be replaced but more likely augmented by technology to start, so we must be able to adapt and restructure existing workflows over time. This biggest takeaway for me from this read is that we need to begin to have a human resources-oriented conversation in government about how best to approach technological disruption. Many HR departments are ahead of the game on using AI for recruiting and onboarding, but the way we adapt and optimize the existing workforce continues to be a challenge.

🔍 An AI That Reads & Recaps Privacy Policies So That You Don’t Have To http://bit.ly/2EUNwUk

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: When you download a new app or sign-up for a new online service, you’re always presented with a terms of service page. Most of us just click ‘accept’ without reading, because we trade convenience (accessing the app right away) for rights to our data or future legal recourse (the fine print). As a result, someone created an AI bot and browser extension called Polisis, to auto-summarize terms of use in a visual and easy to understand way — plus you can even ask questions about the terms just like your chatting with your attorney. For government agencies, I believe this is a great look at how we should repackage our city ordinances and state laws. Government rules and regulations will always be lengthy in nature, but that doesn’t mean that we can apply a better experience to enable constituents to better understand it.

😲 73 Mind-Blowing Implications of a Driverless Future bit.ly/2skxOiY

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: It seems like each week, I’ve read an article with an interesting perspective about a driverless future that has caught my attention — this week it was an article with 73 perspectives about the coming driverless future. Although I don’t agree with all of them, it is helpful to read opposing views because it challenges and/or validates your own assumptions about the future. One of the 73 that stood out was: “Driver’s licenses will slowly go away as will the Department of Motor Vehicles in most states. Other forms of ID may emerge as people no longer carry driver’s licenses. This will probably correspond with the inevitable digitization of all personal identification — via prints, retina scans or other biometric scanning.” For government agencies, I encourage you to continue to read different perspectives about the future across a variety of disciplines of because in doing so, it forces you to think exponentially.

📄 How AI Is Changing Contracts http://bit.ly/2ogp9bY

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This was a fascinating look at the eventual rise of AI contracting, essentially applying artificial intelligence to contract management software. Government agencies execute 1,000s of contracts a year and applying machine learning to a structured set of contracts could unlock a multitude of use-cases for analysis and management — plus it could even enable them to be stored on a decentralized system like the blockchain. For government agencies, this functionality will be ushered in through an existing contract management platform but keep in mind — in order to get the most out of it, your contracts will need an intelligent structure that can be used to train the software to analyze and manage contracts going forward.

🚲 Lyft is teaming up with Baltimore’s bike-share system http://bit.ly/2odq4Kn

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Mobility and smart transportation are major focus areas for government agencies today. Many existing public transit systems have been disrupted by changes in behavior or the rise of new models of mobility, like Uber and Lyft. In this new era, smarter transit does not mean going at it alone — government agencies must partner with private sector companies to create interconnected transit systems. What Lyft is doing in Baltimore is a great example of building a networked ecosystem with transit. For government agencies, it’s important to remember that you will play an important foundation and catalyst for these collaborations to happen. The World Economic Forum recently put out a report on Designing a Seamless Integrated Mobility System [PDF] that validates the network model Baltimore is starting with bike-sharing and ride-sharing.

Read the full article on Medium.

Drone hitchhiking, algorithms gone wild and a city plans an ICO — This Week’s 10 Reads from a Chief Innovation Officer

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I read over 100 articles this week so you don’t have to — Here are the top 10 you should read over the weekend and why they matter for the public sector. Let’s dive in to this week’s reads —

The Articles —

Out of over 100 articles, here are the top 10 that stood out this week:

🚛 Amazon’s delivery drones could hitch rides on trucks to save powerhttp://bit.ly/2EfDts0

🚀 SpaceX launches Falcon Heavy, the world’s most powerful rocket http://cnnmon.ie/2GWdnfh

😎 Chinese Police Add Facial-Recognition Glasses to Surveillance Arsenal http://on.wsj.com/2nM1NeS

🤑 The city of Berkeley wants in on the cryptocurrency mania http://bit.ly/2E9aFkU

👉 On This Blockchain-Based Version Of Airbnb, There’s No Middleman http://bit.ly/2E8KeQl

📱 Mozilla announces an open gateway for the internet of things http://tcrn.ch/2sewUnR

🐝 How Swarm Intelligence Is Making Simple Tech Much Smarter http://bit.ly/2Ech4jr

📉 A down day on the markets? Analysts say blame the machines. http://wapo.st/2ENdSru

💼 Here’s how ‘employees’ of platforms like Uber could get proper benefits http://bit.ly/2nQJXHz

🎨 Artists envisioned the future of work, and the results are pure fantasy http://bit.ly/2sol22O

The Bottom Line —

Just in case you don’t have time to read each article, here are the key takeaways and why each one matters for government:

🚛 Amazon’s delivery drones could hitch rides on trucks to save power http://bit.ly/2EfDts0

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: In a recent patent filing, Amazon outlined a concept where delivery drones could hitch a ride on other transportation vehicles (through a negotiated fee) for parts of their delivery trip. Range has always been a concern of drone delivery, but Amazon’s patent filings show they think the answer could be leveraging parts of the existing transportation network like trucks and even trains. For government, it’s important to remember that it will be impossible to try to regulate and design infrastructure for each component of our transportation networks individually; rather, we must prepare for a future where people, self-driving vehicles, delivery drones, etc. are able to collaborate for great efficiency.

🚀 SpaceX launches Falcon Heavy, the world’s most powerful rocket http://cnnmon.ie/2GWdnfh

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This week, the world paused for a few minutes as Elon Musk and SpaceX launched the Falcon Heavy rocket (and Musk’s Tesla Roadster) into orbit. It was an exciting moment to witness for those of us that were not here to witness the Apollo program in its glory days. So you might be wondering, what does this have to do with government? Well, this launch shows a further democratization of space, which will lead to some elements that will impact government. There are two coming implications for government:

  1. Access to Space — SpaceX has significantly reduced the cost of launching items to space and combine this trend with the rise of inexpensive CubeSats (you can build a satellite for $40,000) — and you have the makings for some disruptive things. State agencies that are tasked with functions that require access to high-resolution imagery may begin to look at launching a CubeSat as a cheaper option then licensing imagery or sensor data.
  2. Connectivity Musk wants to connect Earth, and with SpaceX and the largest Internet satellite constellation project, he might just be able to do so. For rural agencies, connectivity can be a struggle and satellite-based internet has never been a sustainable option — but what Musk is proposing could change that and hopefully enable the rest of the world to come online.
😎 Chinese Police Add Facial-Recognition Glasses to Surveillance Arsenal http://on.wsj.com/2nM1NeS

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Last week, one of the reads was about the race for developing augmented reality (AR) glasses — and this week we have a read that is a fitting example of where this technology is heading for first responders. First, there are definitely privacy implications of head-mounted cameras always scanning and recording, similar to the debates happening now about fixed license plate readers and going all the way back to Google Glass. For government, these issues will need to be handled but there is so much opportunity in embedding intelligent sensing (through AI, machine learning, etc.) capabilities on top of cameras for first responders. For example, imagine making every police body camera a tool that also was constantly on the lookout for a firearm or other indicators that the officer may have missed in the speed of the moment. Then it’s no longer just a camera that records things — it becomes another set of eyes for augmented the officer and protecting the public.

🤑 The city of Berkeley wants in on the cryptocurrency mania http://bit.ly/2E9aFkU

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Talk about pushing the envelope, what the City of Berkeley is proposing could lead to big disruptions in the way cities raise capital. Government agencies commonly sell bonds to finance capital improvements and other capital needs, but the City of Berkeley is proposing emulating an Initial Coin Offering (ICO) to raise funding in collaboration with Neighborly and the Blockchain Lab at U.C. Berkeley. This experiment could help open the door to a full city ICO in the future, making it significantly easier and more transparent to raise capital for cities of all sizes. If you’re interested in learning more, GovTech did a great deep dive into this announcement.

👉 On This Blockchain-Based Version Of Airbnb, There’s No Middleman http://bit.ly/2E8KeQl

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Blockchain, which is the underlying infrastructure for bitcoin (and used as a foundation in all other cryptocurrencies), is a decentralized ledger that is immutable, permissionless and transparent. What makes the blockchain infrastructure so disruptive is that you no longer need a central authority (i.e. a bank, government, etc.) for trust. The exciting thing here is that cryptocurrencies, like bitcoin, are not the only use-case for the infrastructure — you can do peer-to-peer lending, smart contracts, etc. Now we’ve seen one of the first sharing economy use-cases for the technology that allows individuals to rent out a room in their house or the entire house, directly with the individual that is interested in doing so — disrupting Airbnb as a central authority in the process. For government agencies, if you think Uber challenged your regulatory environment just wait till self-driving cars are dispatched on a peer-to-peer marketplace, where there is no central authority. If you’re interested in learning more about blockchain for government, I have compiled some links on my website — including a recent DSPI webinar on blockchain for state government.

📱 Mozilla announces an open gateway for the internet of things http://tcrn.ch/2sewUnR

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This was an interesting announcement by Mozilla, that instead of letting the large companies (i.e., Apple, Amazon, Google, etc.) determine the standards for your internet of things devices — it should be open and interoperable across manufacturers. Mozilla’s describes it best in the announcement on their website, “We believe the future of connected devices should be more like the open web. The future should be decentralized and should put the power and control into the hands of the people who use those devices. This is why we are committed to defining open standards and frameworks.” For government agencies, it’s important to be involved in the conversations shaping standards and protocols around IoT, because a smart home’s infrastructure can can be easily turned against a government agency or mission-critical infrastructure if the right safeguards are not in place.

🐝 How Swarm Intelligence Is Making Simple Tech Much Smarter http://bit.ly/2Ech4jr

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This was an interesting read about swarm behavior and its implications on robotics, data mining, and human behavior. For government, you don’t need to become a swarm intelligence expert to be a good planner — but there is a benefit in understanding that your employees and the people you serve in your city or state are a network of opportunity. This network can be used to do more than just their predefined roles — they can solve major challenges if you design an experience that enables them to collectively act. You can read more about what I think this system will look like here and if you’re interested in diving deeper in swarm/emergent behavior, I would recommend reading Emergence by Steven Johnson.

📉 A down day on the markets? Analysts say blame the machines. http://wapo.st/2ENdSru

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: As we saw this week, the markets had a volatile week. There were many fingers being pointed, from political to the jobs report to this — the algorithms. It’s no surprise that in the rapid-fire world of electronic trading, algorithms are a trading firms strongest asset — but these algorithms are designed to respond to changing market conditions that can lead to a continuous cycle of correction if left unchecked. Investopedia mirrors these thoughts and compiled a good roundup of this issue following the week’s activities. For government agencies, this is a good reminder that as we increasingly automate functions of service delivery — there is still value in keeping a human in the loop.

Read the full article on Medium

Machines learning from machines, strategies for upskilling employees and the race for augmented reality (AR) glasses — This Week’s 10 Reads from a Chief Innovation Officer

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I read over 100 articles this week so you don’t have to — Here are the top 10 you should read over the weekend and why they matter for the public sector. Let’s dive in to this week’s reads —

The Articles —

Out of over 100 articles, here are the top 10 that stood out this week:

👓 The Race for AR Glasses Starts Now http://bit.ly/2nluZs6

🏙 So Maybe Uber and Lyft Aren’t Ruining the American City http://bit.ly/2DPIqvk

⌚️A fast-evolving new botnet could take gadgets in your home to the dark side http://bit.ly/2Fwv2sn

✅ What Changes When AI Is So Accessible That Everyone Can Use It? http://bit.ly/2BFnkK8

🤖 As AI Makes More Decisions, the Nature of Leadership Will Change http://bit.ly/2GtdXkk

🚧 Why Companies Don’t Respond to Digital Disruption http://bit.ly/2EnDIlH

📈 Machines Teaching Each Other Could Be the Biggest Exponential Trend in AI http://bit.ly/2nESvk4

💡 Great insight report on a reskilling and upskilling strategies from the World Economic Forum http://bit.ly/2DHLqWz [PDF]

💰 Why a major cyber-attack could be as costly as a hurricane http://zd.net/2nnrEZv

👀 Your city is watching you — How machine learning and “computer vision” will transform our cities http://bit.ly/2EnXe1b

The Bottom Line —

Just in case you don’t have time to read each article, here are the key takeaways and why each one matters for government:

👓 The Race for AR Glasses Starts Now http://bit.ly/2nluZs6

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Augmented Reality (AR), which is technology that overlays — or augments — your live view through glasses or a headset, continues to grow as a focus area for many computer and mobile phone companies. Why is this? Some see AR as the eventual replacement of your mobile phone, but I tend to agree with TIME columnist, Tim Bajarin, who believes mobile phones, “will become even more essential to our daily lives in the future. Whether that tech stays in the rectangular-slate shape we know today or it morphs into some kind of wearable “brain,” the technical wizardry that powers today’s smartphones will evolve and make it possible to walk around and access information without ever needing to look at a screen.” For government agencies, AR will play a significant role in the frontlines of government operations, from first responders to utility workers, by providing employees a layer of situational awareness not possible through a mobile phone alone.

🏙 So Maybe Uber and Lyft Aren’t Ruining the American City http://bit.ly/2DPIqvk

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: As the title of this article implies, there’s a constant debate in government on whether ridesharing companies are adversely impacting our cities. Although the studies may sometimes be inconclusive, there is little doubt that ridesharing companies fill a gap in first and last-mile transportation options that are difficult, or incredibly expensive, for government agencies to do on their own. The opportunity for government agencies is to partner with ridesharing companies to make them an extension of your existing transportation systems similar to what Phoenix is doing with Lyft, which will provide a great foundation for the eventual automation coming to their fleets.

⌚️A fast-evolving new botnet could take gadgets in your home to the dark side http://bit.ly/2Fwv2sn

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Satori is the latest malware (evolved from a previous version) that is gaining traction by infecting consumer Internet-connected devices, such as your smart home thermostat, to become part of a botnet. What’s important to remember is that these consumer devices in volume can create havoc for government agencies. Imagine if the malware turned everyone’s connected thermostat down 20-degrees at the same time — lights out! Government agencies need to become more proactive in Internet of Things (IoT) standards and education down to the consumer level. Government agencies today don’t just need to worry about protecting their SCADA systems, they need to plan for and mitigate consumer IoT’s ability to disrupt mission-critical systems.

✅ What Changes When AI Is So Accessible That Everyone Can Use It? http://bit.ly/2BFnkK8

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Last week we read about the rise of the first graphic artificial intelligence (AI) system, and this article was a great follow-up by providing a look into companies that are trying to lower the barriers of using AI inside and outside of their organizations. For government agencies, realizing the full benefits of AI today requires an expertise that most agencies do not have in-house, but this is where technology can fill a gap. The author’s say it best, But what’s clear is that the democratization of AI is underway, and the competitive advantage could soon be shifting from those companies with advanced in-house AI expertise to those firms with the most innovative worker ideas for utilizing that technology.” Just replace company with government :)

🤖 As AI Makes More Decisions, the Nature of Leadership Will Change http://bit.ly/2GtdXkk

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Most articles you read about artificial intelligence (AI), discuss the impact it will have on jobs, skills and the future of work — but what about leadership? This read was a fascinating look a why AI will require leaders to develop new skills around the following domains:humility, adaptability, vision, and engagement. These also closely mirror my own observations on what I see as the next version of leadership — Leadership 2.0. For government leaders, the rise of AI cannot be simply managed as just another technology entering our organizations; rather, we must recognize that it requires a new way of thinking and leadership to realize all its benefit.

🚧 Why Companies Don’t Respond to Digital Disruption http://bit.ly/2EnDIlH

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Although this article was written for corporations to help them understand the importance and risk of inaction with digital technologies, there are also many parallels to that in government. The author makes the point that companies may not be responding because they don’t perceive the dangers posed to their organization by digital disruption,” which is also a good way to describe inaction in government agencies at times (as well as a lack of funding). For government agencies, it’s important to remember that even though you are government — you can be displaced and disrupted by digital technologies. For example, ridesharing companies, which are essentially facilitating a logistics technology, have already begun to have a major impact on mass transportation utilization. The question for government agencies is what are you doing daily to keep up with the pace of change? If you need a starting point, I’ve put together some recommendations on how to plan for exponential change.

📈 Machines Teaching Each Other Could Be the Biggest Exponential Trend in AI http://bit.ly/2nESvk4

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This was a fascinating read of an exponential trend we don’t often consider — machines teaching machines. Machine learning, a component of Artificial Intelligence (AI), is getting smarter and faster at learning without requiring much human input. The author points out how quickly Tesla’s Autopilot feature improves by leveraging — and learning from — the collective wisdom and human corrections of all Telsa vehicles on the road. When you apply this example to Internet-connected fleets, streetlights, and other technology government agencies oversee, machine learning will help us unlock insights and correlation we cannot begin to imagine.

💡 Great insight report on a reskilling and upskilling strategies from the World Economic Forumhttp://bit.ly/2DHLqWz [PDF]

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Thanks to exponential change, we know that the jobs we have today will look completely different in the next 5–10 years — the question is, what do we do about it? This report from the World Economic Forum and Boston Consulting Group, providing strategies on how to identify job transition and reskilling opportunities in the workforce (including an interesting look at some of the projected changes in job families by 2026). For government agencies, whether you’re an executive and frontline employee, it’s important to begin thinking and planning about how to respond to these exponential changes and their impact on the workforce. For those of you interested in diving deeper, there’s a report that ties to this on the Eight Futures of Work: Scenarios and their Implications, describing different visions of the future of work by 2030.

Read the full article on Medium

Autonomous police cars, codeless AI and the rise of self driving car lawsuits — This Week’s 10 Reads from a Chief Innovation Officer

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I read over 100 articles this week so you don’t have to — Here are the top 10 you should read over the weekend and why they matter for the public sector. Let’s dive in to this week’s reads —

The Articles —

Out of over 100 articles, here are the top 10 that stood out this week:

🚔 Ford Has An Idea For An Autonomous Police Car http://bit.ly/2EaaPJK

✏️ Windows 10’s new app: @Microsoft’s Ink to Code turns sketches into working code http://zd.net/2nfDy7y

🤖 Every study we could find on what automation will do to jobs, in one chart http://bit.ly/2DE5Gbr

📱 Your new car will have apps instead of options http://bit.ly/2DCVwrO

😈 You can expect surreptitious cryptocurrency mining to join ransomware as a big threat this year. http://bit.ly/2BzeQo2

🏍 A motorcyclist is suing GM after crashing into its self-driving car http://bit.ly/2GmzfjK

📉 The era of the cloud’s total dominance is drawing to a close http://econ.st/2n00fwE

⚡️ It’s Time for Electric Companies to Pivot http://bit.ly/2mZYNuc

💵 The battle for consumers gets physical (instead of virtual) http://tcrn.ch/2neUtXQ

💻 This Is The World’s First Graphical AI Interface http://bit.ly/2Ebbn1G

The Bottom Line —

Just in case you don’t have time to read each article, here are the key takeaways and why each one matters for government:

🚔 Ford Motor Company Has An Idea For An Autonomous Police Car http://bit.ly/2EaaPJK

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Although not all patents are commercialized, they are a great way to look at a company’s vision and strategy for making sense of the future. Ford’s patent of an autonomous police paints one picture of the future of public safety in a world full of autonomous vehicles. The most interesting aspect of the patent is not the self-driving component, but how they handle the process of issuing a citation in the future — and it doesn’t require you to stop. The process is similar to running a red light camera, except you don’t have to wait for the ticket in the mail — it’s automatically issued and potentially paid by the vehicle on behalf of the occupant. For government agencies, this can be a force multiplier and as Bill Schrier points out in his tweet, maybe a good use-case for the nationwide FirstNet network.

✏️ Windows 10’s new app: Microsofts’s Ink to Code turns sketches into working code http://zd.net/2nfDy7y

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Today, you must possess knowledge of a software programming language in order to build any new software programs. But this is no longer going to be the norm — in fact, even Wired called coding the next potential blue-collar job. This new technology from Microsoft validates a growing shift in how we create technology, one in which there are little to no barriers to creating new digital experiences. For government, this can unlock new possibilities from existing employees to design better experiences without having to learn a programming language. It’s important to remember that as technology creation has become democratized, constituents will have the ability to create technology (and will increasingly do so) to solve issues that will touch government. This will create an opportunity for government agencies to embrace the cognitive surplus of people to become more effective — or be disrupted by it.

🤖 Every study we could find on what automation will do to jobs, in one chart http://bit.ly/2DE5Gbr

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: There are many perspectives in the market about how automation and artificial intelligence will impact jobs. Our fascination with automation and its impact even led the BBC to create a search engine to see when your job will be replaced by technology. Unfortunately, all of these studies and reports have widely differing opinions on this topic, which is why this article was a fascinating way to see all the major perspectives in one table. For government agencies, the lesson here is that we really don’t know the full impact automation will have on the workforce, but we know it will undeniably have a major impact. The important thing for agencies to do is to continue to follow the conversations and market research on this topic, as well as watching how automation impacts the private-sector.

📱 Your new car will have apps instead of options http://bit.ly/2DCVwrO

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: When you purchase a vehicle, you’re normally stuck with the factory packages you get — unless you do aftermarket upgrades, which can be expensive and require your vehicle to be out of commission as they are physically installed. This is all beginning to change. When you picture the rise of car apps, you may think of an app store on your car entertainment system that lets you stream music from Spotify or NPR, but it’s actually so much more than that today. Tesla gave us a first look at how software updates can unlock new functions with existing hardware, and many automakers are working on leveraging this same model to enable consumers to purchase subscriptions or packages that upgrade car functions — after they’ve purchased their vehicles. For government agencies, it’s important to remember that Tesla’s over-the-air update gave all their Model S vehicles self-driving capabilities overnight with no government approvals or involvement. Government agencies will need to be prepared for this happening more often and adjust the ways they regulate in this new era.

😈 You can expect surreptitious cryptocurrency mining to join ransomware as a big threat this year. http://bit.ly/2BzeQo2

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: In the most recent study from the Online Trust Alliance, the number of cybersecurity incidents doubled in 2017 — continuing a multi-year trend of exponential growth. For government agencies, the study indicates you can expect to see this same trend in 2018 as well as the rise of new threat vectors, such as cryptojacking. This changing landscape will lead to major infrastructure shifts in government, but it also will require a shift from an application-centric cybersecurity approach to one focused on enterprise risk management.

🏍 A motorcyclist is suing GM after crashing into its self-driving car http://bit.ly/2GmzfjK

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: If you get into an accident today, understanding who’s responsible is fairly straightforward — it’s either you or the other party. On rare occasions, there are vehicle flaws that will shift the liability to the car manufacturer, but even with that, there’s plenty of case law with how those situations will most likely be resolved. Enter self-driving cars and a new lawsuit that is forcing a conversation around who is liable when a self-driving car makes a mistake. Although self-driving vehicles are still produced by a major manufacturer, they are enabled by many other layers of technology not directly controlled by the manufacturer. Comet Labs created a graphic (below) to illustrate the over 263 companies tackling different parts of the self-driving vehicle market — from software to physical sensors. The key takeaway for government is that we are entering an era where countless lawsuits will seek to determine who’s ultimately responsible when autonomous systems make mistakes— and government agencies (especially cities) will find themselves increasingly named in these new lawsuits as they continue to focus on smart transportation systems.

📉 The era of the cloud’s total dominance is drawing to a close http://econ.st/2n00fwE

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: There a major shifts happening to how large-scale systems are architected — and many of the new changes are happening at the edge. This doesn’t mean that cloud systems are going to decline, it means that cloud systems are going to evolve to also do processing at the edge of networks. Think about a city with thousands of smart streetlights all embedded with environmental sensors and connectivity. It would not make sense to have this data all aggregated and centrally processed, rather initial processing can happen at the edge by individual lights or in groups of lights. For government agencies, putting processing power at the edge increases the resiliency and speed of the network, but also raises cybersecurity risks that must be mitigated — because that network of streetlights could be hacked or become a gateway to critical infrastructure hacks.

Read the full article on Medium.

The rise of robo-advisers, 3D printed pharmaceuticals and the coherence economy— This Week’s 10 Reads from a Chief Innovation Officer

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I read over 100 articles this week so you don’t have to — Here are the top 10 you should read over the weekend and why they matter for the public sector. Let’s dive in to this week’s reads —

The Articles —

Out of over 100 articles, here are the top 10 that stood out this week:

🤖 Robo-Advisers Are Coming to Consulting and Corporate Strategy http://bit.ly/2DjiZBn

🚘 Lyft says nearly 250K of its passengers ditched a personal car in 2017 http://tcrn.ch/2mRKyax

✅ How Fast Is AI Progressing? Stanford’s New Report Card for Artificial Intelligence http://bit.ly/2DUdHKi

🤯 Some of the World’s Largest Employers No Longer Sell Things, They Rent Workers http://on.wsj.com/2D8eHJW

💊 You could soon be manufacturing your own drugs — thanks to 3D printing http://bit.ly/2DP4T8w

💼 AI Plus Human Intelligence Is The Future Of Work http://bit.ly/2CWMzJi

🚨 Drone comes to the rescue of two swimmers in Australia http://tcrn.ch/2DMnQZO

📈 Welcome to the Coherence Economy http://bit.ly/2mXmMKD

💡 Will Edge Computing Change How Government Operates? http://bit.ly/2DDn8xL

📊 Deloitte Insights: Tech Trends — http://bit.ly/2DklnV7 [PDF]

The Bottom Line —

Just in case you don’t have time to read each article, here are the key takeaways and why each one matters for government:

🤖 Robo-Advisers Are Coming to Consulting and Corporate Strategy http://bit.ly/2DjiZBn

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: We live in a software-defined world, one where software has replaced and augmented numerous layers of organizations across every industry — and strategy and consulting is the next stop. The abundance of big data and rise of artificial intelligence has enabled us to witness the rise of software-defined roles, such as the first algorithm appointed to a board position, and government could likely be the next destination for these roles to find a home. In the not-to-distant future, your internal auditors will be software, your CFO will consult software advisors, and your governance process will involve a software-based role at some point in the process.

🚘 Lyft says nearly 250K of its passengers ditched a personal car in 2017 http://tcrn.ch/2mRKyax

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: The rise of ridesharing and other sharing economy business models have disrupted the traditional models of ownership — moving us from a model of ownership to one focused on paying for accessing assets. Lyft’s report of 250,000 riders who ditched their personal vehicles in 2017 is a clear indicator that this trend is exponentially increasing. For government, this means that we need to rapidly explore new regulatory and tax models to adjust for a shift in how we access assets going forward.

✅ How Fast Is AI Progressing? Stanford’s New Report Card for Artificial Intelligence http://bit.ly/2DUdHKi

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: It seems every day the web is flooded with new articles about artificial intelligence impacting XYZ, each with its own positive or negative spin on the net result. In the process of sifting through all of these perspectives about AI, we can lose sight of where the development of AI actually is. Thanks to Stanford University, there’s now a new report card that benchmarks AI’s progress — to provide a reality check of multiple lenses of its development. For government agencies, this is a great way to keep up with the development of AI as you explore use-cases in your own organizations. I also encourage you to check out the GSA’s Emerging Citizen Technology Asset as another resource to track use-cases and current uses of these new emerging technologies.

🤯 Some of the World’s Largest Employers No Longer Sell Things, They Rent Workers http://on.wsj.com/2D8eHJW

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: We’ve seen a massive shift in the model of how work is completed in organizations — one shifting from full-time workers to the more agile, freelancers — also validated in one of the reads from last week. This article explores that the largest employers today are no longer traditional brick and mortar stores, but now human capital firms that pool and sell specialized labor. For government agencies, it’s important to remember that it will increasingly become more difficult to hire (full-time) all of the specialized talents that you need — so tapping into these new models of labor procurement will provide a helpful opportunity to bridge talent gaps. Agencies that leverage these new models will undeniably face challenges with existing labor regulations, unions, and benefit structures — but this is expected and part of every major disruptive change to organizational models.

💊 You could soon be manufacturing your own drugs — thanks to 3D printing http://bit.ly/2DP4T8w

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This was an interesting read about the evolution of 3D printing into a new area that government touches — pharmaceuticals. We’ve seen 3D printed homes, but as with all exponential technologies, it’s rapidly evolving into new use-cases that challenge existing regulatory structures and delivery mechanisms. For this specific case, the great news is that the government (FDA) has proactively begun to explore these implications. For government agencies interested in proactively doing the same, you can read my thoughts in a new planning framework called Exponential Planning.

Read the full article on Medium

Artificial Intelligence meets 911 call centers, flood sensors and over 6 million smart speakers — This Week’s 10 Reads from a Chief Innovation Officer

I read over 100 articles this week so you don’t have to — Here are the top 10 you should read over the weekend and why they matter for the public sector. Let’s dive in to this week’s —

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The Articles —

Out of over 100 articles, here are the top 10 that stood out this week:

🌊 Iowa Flood Sensors Wade into Artificial Intelligence http://bit.ly/2qS3ZoU

📱 Here are the most common uses of AI on your smartphone today http://read.bi/2mgBr2R

🤯 Almost all the US jobs created since 2005 are temporary http://bit.ly/2mbU6x2

🚚 Robomart is the latest startup to try and unseat the local convenience store http://tcrn.ch/2CKlVqq

👉 Google sold over 6 million smart speakers with AI in 2017 http://bit.ly/2F5l16f

📈 How data mining charts the course of history hidden in government archives http://bit.ly/2CLhcoB

🚨 Having A Heart Attack? This AI Helps Emergency Dispatchers Find Out http://bit.ly/2D496ap

⚠️ Cybersecurity Today Is Treated Like Accounting Before Enron http://nyti.ms/2CQJ1vt

🏁 A Culture of Relentless Improvement http://on.inc.com/2D4Hakq

🔮 8 Trends of the Internet of Things in 2018 — OpenMind http://bit.ly/2EaibLS

The Bottom Line —

Just in case you don’t have time to read each article, here are the key takeaways and why each one matters for government:

🌊 Iowa Flood Sensors Wade into Artificial Intelligence http://bit.ly/2qS3ZoU

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Government agencies have more data then they know what to do with, and more specifically, how to extract value out of. This big data problem is only getting worse as more Internet-enabled devices are deployed in cities across the country, but the approach from the Iowa Flood Center is a great glimpse at what’s next for open data. By applying artificial intelligence and focusing on the user experience, they have created a way that enables data to be truly accessible by anyone regardless of their expertise. For government employees, elected officials and citizens in the future, this is what the future looks like — thousands of databases, one experience.

📱 Here are the most common uses of AI on your smartphone today http://read.bi/2mgBr2R

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This was a fascinating visualization that showed artificial intelligence isn’t years away, it’s something we use components of every day on our phones — but may not always be aware of. The lesson for government here is twofold:

#1 AI, machine learning, and deep learning have the potential to do incredibly complex tasks but also augment simple yet tedious work (i.e., photo classification).

#2 As we design new services for constituents and employees to access government, we must ensure that we build awareness of these new access points.

🤯 Almost all the US jobs created since 2005 are temporary http://bit.ly/2mbU6x2

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Much of the discussion about the future of work has focused on the role and skills needed for jobs in the future. We’ve debated whether robots will replace certain job titles that exist today and how to reskill existing employees to new technologies, but there has been little discussion about the way work itself is changing. This research helps indicate a shift in the very model of work, one that is moving to a more task (or gig) based setting. There will be vast implications to the workforce with these changes, but they’re not all bad if you know how to harness it properly.

🚚 Robomart is the latest startup to try and unseat the local convenience store http://tcrn.ch/2CKlVqq

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: There’s no argument that on-demand ridesharing companies like Uber are disrupting existing mass transit systems (And even our reliance on ambulances). Many of these ridesharing companies have expanded their capabilities by launching delivery overlays for mom-and-pop shops and even large companies like Amazon. But if I order a product to be delivered in 1 hour, it still requires an inefficient path for delivery that can congest a transit network (driver queued, driver picks up product, driver brings product, driver returns or is re-queued). Not something that will work well at scale across multiple vendors. The startup Robomart has an interesting concept where the store comes to you and it eliminates two legs of the trip because it contains the warehouse of the product you want. This model can also be applied to food preparation, as we’ve seen with Pizza Hut’s latest self-driving delivering car announcement, which points to a future where employees could make and cook pizzas while being whizzed around the city in an autonomous store. For government, autonomous businesses may become the next regulatory challenge that needs to be prepared for.

Read the full article on Medium

The rise of AI operators, dynamic parking meters and Amazon Echo as a crime fighter— This Week’s 10 Reads from a Chief Innovation Officer

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I read over 100 articles this week so you don’t have to — Here are the top 10 you should read over the weekend and why they matter for the public sector. Let’s dive in to this week’s —

The Articles —

Out of over 100 articles, here are the top 10 that stood out this week:

👩‍💻 AI operators will play a critical role as bots redefine the workplace http://bit.ly/2lvj4aa

🇪🇪 Estonia, the Digital Republic http://bit.ly/2lFSaNU

📊 New Metrics for the Algorithmic Enterprise — http://bit.ly/2DReOtc

⚖️ Innovating Regulation http://bit.ly/2lYv7Nm

👿 The nasty surprises hackers have in store for us in 2018 http://bit.ly/2DNXkxA

🚔 UK police turn to Amazon Echo in the fight against crime | http://zd.net/2ESPcNF

💡 We Need Large Innovations — Vinod Khosla http://bit.ly/2CI4cgM

🙀 Saudi Aramco execs see Uber as a bigger threat to oil demand than Tesla http://read.bi/2DUeklY

💸 San Francisco Rolls Out Dynamic Parking Rate Model http://bit.ly/2E7c5fp

🗣 Google’s New Text-to-Speech AI Is so Good We Bet You Can’t Tell It From a Real Human http://on.inc.com/2lyrU79

The Bottom Line —

Just in case you don’t have time to read each article, here are the key takeaways and why each one matters for government:

👩‍💻 AI operators will play a critical role as bots redefine the workplace http://bit.ly/2lvj4aa

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: As artificial intelligence enters the enterprise, it will not lead the the immediate replacement of jobs; rather, it will augment existing job functions and create a new opportunity for impacted employees to help train the software and hardware (thus giving rise to AI operators). AI operators won’t need to be skilled in machine learning, they’ll just need to operate as an intermediary that helps train and coach new enterprise software and hardware on the job at hand. I see this especially impacting cybersecurity as most cybersecurity functions will be replaced by AI, yet still coached by a human. For example, in the future your Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) could be replaced by AI and shift the existing human talent to the job of a risk mitigation officer — someone who helps orchestrate the AIs to mitigate risks. Don’t believe me, the City of Long Beach, California is already working on this.

🇪🇪 Estonia, the Digital Republic http://bit.ly/2lFSaNU

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Although Estonia has a small population of roughly 1.3 million people, it has become a shining example of a national government embracing next-generation technology to increase efficiency (and economic development). From a blockchain-based e-residency program to the first national election held on the Internet — Estonia provides a glimpse of what’s possible when a government agencies anticipates change instead of being disrupted by it.

📊 New Metrics for the Algorithmic Enterprise —  http://bit.ly/2DReOtc

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: As functions of government service delivery become augmented or replaced by algorithms, it will be important for agencies to incorporate new metrics to understand their internal and external impact. Algorithmic delivery systems will enable government to be more effective and responsive, but it will require us to rethink the landscape of how we measure performance to ensure the new technologies we leverage are creating the desired impact we envisioned. 

⚖️ Innovating Regulation http://bit.ly/2lYv7Nm

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: The exponential era we live in has given rise to many new business models, like Uber and Lyft, that run up against the existing regulatory structure put in place by government. These disruptive business models are emerging more frequently, requiring government agencies to rapidly respond or challenge a company’s ability to operate. It was time for a new way of thinking on government regulations, so I was encourage to see the Aspen Institute’s Center for Urban Innovation put out new strategies to help government rethink regulations across food, permitting, transportation and procurement. I encourage you to check it out and my hope is that government agencies can begin to share and build on these strategies collectively. 

👿 The nasty surprises hackers have in store for us in 2018 http://bit.ly/2DNXkxA

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This article is a good reminder that the cybersecurity landscape is a constantly moving target and evolving threat landscape — and 2018 is going to have some nasty surprises for government. For example, in 2017 ransomware impacted agencies across the country, but one of the predictions in this article is that ransomware is going to the cloud — which creates new challenges in response and most agencies disaster recovery plans. I encourage all government agencies to think through the 5 other cybersecurity predictions and how they might respond as things start to heat up in 2018.

🚔 UK police turn to Amazon Echo in the fight against crime | http://zd.net/2ESPcNF

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This article provided an interesting look at how one UK city is looking at using an Amazon Echo has a crime fighting tool — specifically around crime and missing person bulletins but also looking to new ways to make data and emergency services accessible through voice. Proactive information delivery (versus having to ask Alexa for information) is something that would make this even more useful, and Amazon is already enabling it for certain skills. This is just the start, I can also imagine a day where gunshot detection, like ShotSpotter, may just be a passively crowdsource skill that citizens opt-into on their device. Going forward, government agencies should continue to explore ways to leverage these smart speakers, while balancing privacy concerns, as a potential to increase their accessibility and effectiveness for constituents. 

💡 We Need Large Innovations — Vinod Khosla http://bit.ly/2CI4cgM

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This was a fitting read for going into a new year — and my takeaway for government after reading this article is that it’s time to start looking a ways to fundamentally reinvent certain models of government service delivery. Government is getting good at incremental innovation and performance improvements, but what about creating new models altogether? My hope for agencies is that in addition to their existing innovation work, they will look to having 5–10% of their innovation portfolio focused on new model experimentation. A good starting point for interested agencies is Zero to One, by Peter Thiel

Read the full article on Medium

It’s Time To Flip The School District - Why Empowerment — Not Technology — Is The Key To Transforming Education.

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As a technology optimist, and for years I have encouraged government and education institutions to embrace technology to unlock new efficiencies and prepare for an uncertain future. In education, there is no doubt that technology along with new instructional models, like project-based-learning (PBL), have made significant impacts in the classroom — but there’s a dangerous organizational side-effect no one wants to talk about — and it’s creating havoc in districts across the country.

The Role of The Teacher

The digital exhaust from all of the technology we put in schools is what is commonly referred to as big data. Big data has had a significant impact on the education system, it’s enabled us to extract insights in the learning process and even gave rise to personalized learning systems that optimized the learning process based on a user’s own data. As far as where the data comes from, there is no shortage of test, assessments, benchmarks, etc. used to collect this data on a regular basis — but the challenge is these data gathering systems are sometimes used as the primary system of education performance measurement. So if we assess the effectiveness of our education system and educators from quantifiable data alone, where does the teacher and their insights fit into this picture?

Today’s Data Fallacy

Today, the quantitive data collected by school districts can provide concrete, factual representations of performance, but it often lacks context or narrative for interrupting results. This requires that context and interpretation be applied at some point after the data is collected. Does it happen in the trenches of where the data is created (i.e., the classroom) or at the top of the organizational stack by the experts (i.e. superintendent or cabinet)? More often then not, today this analysis and interpretation occur at the top (or is programmed using preferences from the top) and the changes from it are pushed down through the organization. This may seem logical, but it’s not the right setup to enable innovation to flourish. Innovation is a process that leverages the edge of an organization to become smarter and anticipate needs before they arise. The edge of a school district is where teachers interface with the school district’s product, students. The fallacy of big data today is that if a school district basis all performance on student achievement indicators and doesn’t engage its edge, then how can it possibly innovate? Imagine if a company constantly changes the features of a product due to declining sells without ever asking their sales team why it’s not selling. Maybe it’s the wrong product to begin with.

It’s All About Culture

So the real question is what makes a school district high-performing and innovative? Is it just engaging teachers more often? Leveraging new technology? From what I’ve seen, the highest performing schools have established a culture of innovation that is built through employee empowerment. School districts that encourage employees to test new hunches — to explore new models of learning, don’t just see better outcomes with their students, they also see a more motivated workforce. Now, this is where school leadership plays the most critical role in the process because they are directly responsible for laying the foundation of their district’s culture. Setting the right foundation requires a new perspective on leadership.

Establishing a Culture of Innovation Through New Leadership

School leaders in this exponential era of change need to set a foundation of innovation by being a leader with these ingredients:

  1. Who has vision: You must have a vision that can be shared and embraced across multiple domains in your district. Does your vision apply to teachers or just the school board? For inspiration, read Built to Last.
  2. Who empowers: You must empower all of your employees, especially those at the edge to test their hunches, share insights and collectively work to accomplish the district’s vision. You must also embrace failures as part of the process, because if you don’t — your staff will not take risks. For inspiration on empowerment, read Mindset (thanks to my superintendent sister for the recommendation). For inspiration on rewarding failure, read how Google recognizes failure.
  3. Who is agile and adaptive: You must operate in a continuous state of improvement and you must adapt frequently to change. For inspiration, read Lean Startup.

So now the question for those in leadership positions today: are you a leader who interprets data for your employees or are you a leader who empowers your employees and leverages their insights?

Originally posted on Medium

Exponential predictions for 2018, laser-powered Internet and hacker-infested toys — This Week’s 10 Reads from a Chief Innovation Officer

I read over 100 articles this week so you don’t have to — Here are the top 10 you should read over the weekend and why they matter for the public sector. Let’s dive in to this week’s —

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The Articles —

Out of over 100 articles, here are the top 10 that stood out this week:

🔮 18 Exponential Changes We Can Expect in the Year Ahead http://bit.ly/2lrsK6u

🔎 Digital Disruptors of the World Unite: Interpreting the Fourth Industrial Revolution http://on.wsj.com/2Cs3TZK

🌡 De Blasio Administration Announces Tech Competition to Accelerate Local Climate Action http://on.nyc.gov/2Dr72G4

🚨 Using drones to build the ambulance fleet of the future http://tcrn.ch/2kSwr4K

👾 McKinsey Quarterly 2017 Number 4 — Artificial intelligence takes shape — http://bit.ly/2Cv09Ve

🗄 What can machine learning do? Workforce implications of machine learning http://bit.ly/2Cnpum5

🚙 Riders in Waymo’s self-driving cars will now be insured http://bit.ly/2ElyIxr

💡 Exploring a new approach to connectivity http://bit.ly/2zUqR6s

🤖 The robots are coming and Sweden is fine http://nyti.ms/2C1PYWY

🚂 A cute toy just brought a hacker into your home. http://nyti.ms/2zTImny

The Bottom Line —

Just in case you don’t have time to read each article, here are the key takeaways and why each one matters for government:

🔮 18 Exponential Changes We Can Expect in the Year Ahead http://bit.ly/2lrsK6u

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: As you’ve read in many of my articles, preparing for an uncertain future across multiple domains is an important function that government agencies need to embrace and embed into the way they operate. This article provides a great look at 18 areas that will have exponential changes as we head into 2018.

🔎 Digital Disruptors of the World Unite: Interpreting the Fourth Industrial Revolution http://on.wsj.com/2Cs3TZK

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: There are individual, organizational and societal changes unfolding before us eacb day and as many economists have described, the beginning of a fourth industrial revolution. Along with other technological revolutions, there will be massive changes to labor and productivity — but it’s important for government to understand that it’s going to have more of an impact on it. From the regulatory landscape to physical infrastructure building, this fourth industrial revolution will require government to become more agile in order to keep up.

🌡 De Blasio Administration Announces Tech Competition to Accelerate Local Climate Action http://on.nyc.gov/2Dr72G4

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Mayor De Blasio and his technology team are a shining example that cities are capable of doing more than just existing. Under NYCx, the City of New York is tackling hyperlocal problems such as connectivity, as well as moonshot challenges to push the envelope for government innovation. This reinforces a point I’ve long held, that sustainable innovation starts and is incubated at the local level, then it roles up to higher levels of government. Keep up the great work NYC!

🚨 Using drones to build the ambulance fleet of the future http://tcrn.ch/2kSwr4K

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Last week you read about ambulance ubers, now we’ve moved to an ambulance that can fly. We’ve seen drone package concepts, but Zipline is using drones in Africa to deliver vital medical supplies — and it’s not just a concept, it’s live. This example provides validation of the lifesaving impact that drones can have and we will begin to see more of these use-cases role out to cities across the United States. For government, drones will provide opportunities to augment emergency workers (a video for what that looks like is below), but it will also lead to a host of new regulatory and orchestration challenges that will need to be addressed.

 

👾 McKinsey Quarterly 2017 Number 4 — Artificial intelligence takes shape — http://bit.ly/2Cv09Ve

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: McKinsey puts out great quarterly publications that cover a wide variety of topics — and this month’s really hit home with a focus on artificial intelligence. As your agency looks to integrate and implement elements of AI into your operations in 2018, it’s good to have an industry perspective of where things are today and where they are going.

🗄 What can machine learning do? Workforce implications of machine learning http://bit.ly/2Cnpum5

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Machine learning and artificial intelligence are the most common buzzwords you see at the top of every tech article on the web — but most lack the meat to explain their wild predictions on how AI will do XYZ. That’s why I love this research, posted in an academic journal, that provides an in-depth look at machine learning and the science behind how it will impact our workforce.

🚙 Riders in Waymo’s self-driving cars will now be insured http://bit.ly/2ElyIxr

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: There are numerous regulatory challenges that are uncertain involving self-driving technology, and one of the biggest challenges today is around liability — who’s at fault and who pays when no one is driving. This is why Waymo’s decision to provide passenger insurance in their self-driving vehicles is a great starting point for working out the liability issue. Government agencies will need to continue to work together with the self-driving vehicle industry on a host of other technical and regulatory issues, but this is a promising start.

Read the full article on Medium

The rise of government chatbots, Uber ambulances and cryptojacking— This Week’s 10 Reads from a Chief Innovation Officer

I read over 100 articles this week so you don’t have to — Here are the top 10 you should read over the weekend and why they matter for the public sector. Let’s dive into this week’s —

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The Articles —

Out of over 100 articles, here are the top 10 that stood out this week:

🤖 Meet The City of El Paso’s Chatbot, Ask Laura. http://bit.ly/2oXMSRJ

👀 The Hidden Human Workforce Powering Machine Intelligence http://bit.ly/2Dp8wkW

🖋 How soon will computers replace The Economist’s writers? http://econ.st/2CPmnjG

🚑 Uber’s Impact on Ambulance Usage http://bit.ly/2ABRvCt

🌎 This year the world woke up to the society-shifting power of artificial intelligence http://bit.ly/2oLgJwC

📸 Magic Leap shows off its Magic Leap One ‘Creator’s Edition’ AR headset, shipping in 2018 http://tcrn.ch/2p0OtGG

🤑 Where VC’s Will Invest in 2018: Blockchain, AI, Voice, Pets http://bit.ly/2oXOcUF

📱 Apple will reportedly unify iOS and macOS apps in 2018 http://bit.ly/2BQxYSJ

🔮 These Technologies Will Shape The Future, According To One Of Silicon Valley’s Top VC Firms https://t.co/aPkmT1iGbk

🤐 Is Your Computer Secretly Mining Bitcoin Alternatives? A Guide to ‘Cryptojacking’ http://bit.ly/2l0WRAD

The Bottom Line —

Just in case you don’t have time to read each article, here are the key takeaways and why each one matters for government:

🤖 Meet The City of El Paso’s Chatbot, Ask Laura. http://bit.ly/2oXMSRJ

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: It’s great to see agencies focusing on enabling a better government experience through a variety of emerging technologies — including chatbots. We have seen dozens of government agencies leveraging chatbots for everything from IT helpdesk tickets to connecting computer-less immigrants to city services from AppCityLife. The challenge (and opportunity) will be finding a way to connecting all these separate bots together rather than each agency leveraging a bot with a silo’d database.

👀 The Hidden Human Workforce Powering Machine Intelligence http://bit.ly/2Dp8wkW

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This read provided a good reminder that machine learning current (and will continue) to require a variety of human labor to continue to train software on new use-cases as well as complete tasks that machines still struggle with. Government agencies need to understand that using machine learning and artificial intelligence is not as simple as just signing up to an online service — there is and will continue to remain a level of human involvement that needs to be factored into the training and feedback loops.

🖋 How soon will computers replace The Economist’s writers? http://econ.st/2CPmnjG

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: The Economist put machine learning to work to write an article this week and the results indicated we still have some time before computers become more proficient at the more creative work. For government, this is an early look at a future where open data portals feed automated editorial bots that extract, analyze and summarize (with the preprogrammed human bias) the data. Now imagine all of those tasks being completed in minutes compared to the days and weeks of a traditional investigative reporter — this is the future, and it’s coming.

🚑 Uber’s Impact on Ambulance Usage http://bit.ly/2ABRvCt

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This was a fascinating study that indicated how ridesharing services like Uber, are reducing ambulance usage in certain areas (and for certain injuries). The lesson here for government needs to look to some of these emerging, and often perceived disruptive, companies as an extension of existing ways of doing things. A county in Michigan realized this and piloted using Uber as a way to get people to show up to jury duty — imagine what else it can do.

🌎 This year the world woke up to the society-shifting power of artificial intelligence http://bit.ly/2oLgJwC

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: In 2017, Artificial intelligence (AI) broke from scientific journals and sci-fi movies into the mainstream media. As a result numerous organizations emerged to study and control the development of AI. For government agencies, AI has not had it’s Uber moment yet (a comparison of the way Uber unstoppably rolled out across the globe), but it will. It won’t lead to killer robots any time soon, but it will lead to smarter applications that take the place of government and interface with government like DoNotPay. I see this as an opportunity for government to find proactive ways to partner with the private-sector and other agencies to build meaningful experiences with the technology.

Read the full article on Medium

 

Meet your new lawyer bot, AI discovered a planet and new tech predictions for 2018 — This Week’s 10 Reads from a Chief Innovation Officer

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I read over 100 articles this week so you don’t have to — Here are the top 10 you should read over the weekend and why they matter for the public sector. Let’s dive in —

🔮 Deloitte’s tech predictions for 2018: More AI, digital subscriptions, AR, and live events http://bit.ly/2o3FPXa

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: In the past, government agencies had time to prepare for technology changes to impact their operations. They could simply watch the private-sector and wait a few years before it became widely adopted by their peers — and adapt accordingly. This is no longer possible in the exponential era we will live in, so agencies need to pay close attention to the macro-trends in technology so they can anticipate the future rather than reactively responding to it. These predictions from Deloitte are a great starting point for what’s in store in 2018.

👩‍⚖️ Lawyer-bots are shaking up jobs http://bit.ly/2o002NC

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Each week I’ve put together this series there seems to always be an article about AI replacing some new job title that makes the cut. This week’s new title also comes with a twist, because the rise of lawyer bots won’t just impact the jobs space, it will impact how people (or things in this case) will interface with government. For example, the lawyer bot DoNotPay enables you to automatically fight your parking ticket by generating the necessary paperwork to interface with municipal courts — so agencies must prepare for how AI may become a new customer that needs to interface with and be served by government.

💼 Meet Your New Boss: An Algorithm http://on.wsj.com/2BDrxCz

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: We’ve seen algorithms appointed to company boards before as a new form of corporate governance, but welcome to the era where that algorithm may also become your boss. This article highlights how numerous companies are already using algorithms to orchestrate workflows — including the humans behind them.This can be a force and productivity-multiplier for government agencies that embrace it, but it will also enter unchartered territory on workforce and labor management that won’t be as easier to work through.

💰 City cashing in by selling streets, sidewalks to private owners http://nyp.st/2nJFIA8

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This article provided an interesting look at the practice of private industry buying a public space — and it’s something that is happening more often in cities across the country that struggle with maintaining aging public spaces. As more general revenues are impacted by technology (i.e. self-driving cars that don’t speed), cities will need to get creative with how and what they maintain going forward.

📉 Tencent says there are only 300,000 AI engineers worldwide, but millions are needed http://bit.ly/2AU3VbJ

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: AI is all the rage today and if you’re an AI engineer — not the same as an AI subject matter expert on Twitter — you can make some major bucks. The challenge today is that there are not enough AI engineers to build and expand AI inside of organizations today (which is a problem that public education will need to begin to work on) so companies fight to hire what’s available with lucrative compensations plans. Government agencies looking for AI talent in the future won’t be able to compete on salary so they will need to look at new ways to solve this problem such as on-demand and hybrid employees.

🔑 Zug ID: Exploring the First Publicly Verified Blockchain Identity http://bit.ly/2Br7F5v

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: The crypto-valley of the world is centered around the swiss City of Zug — and they recently announced the beginning of the first publicly verified blockchain identity. This is important because we’re getting closer to a federated identity solution built on top of a decentralized infrastructure, in this case Ethereum. This infrastructure would serve as a secure and modern foundation for citizens to interact with government, businesses and one-another. Another important takeaway from this piece is that the City of Zug is collaborating with the public to identity the best starting use-cases — U.S. agencies should take note for their own pilots.

🚘 Full Tilt: When 100% of Cars Are Autonomous http://nyti.ms/2Cby3gT

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: I’ve seen lots of interesting write ups on autonomous vehicles over the years, but none quite like this one from the New York Times. Rather than talking about when self-driving cars will be here, they explore how self-driving cars will impact various aspects of our lives. It’s an important read for agencies to understand the social impacts that technology will have on the citizens we serve.

Read the Full Article on Medium.

The rise of car subscriptions, code-less machine learning and freelancing in the future of work— This Week’s 10 Reads from a Chief Innovation Officer

I read over 100 articles this week so you don’t have to — Here are the top 10 you should read over the weekend and why they matter for the public sector.

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          🚙 You Will No Longer Lease a Car. You Will Subscribe to It. http://slate.me/2iM8v5a

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Self-driving technology is not the most disruptive thing in the auto industry today (although it will be soon) — today it’s the rise of new ways to obtain a vehicle. From the rise of companies like Car2Go and Silvercar — to on-demand services like Uber and Lyft, these are all examples of the rise of flexible vehicle usage. We’re going from a society of ownership to a society of subscriptions and anything as-a-service. For government agencies, the rise of new flexible models of vehicle ownership will require changes in the tax infrastructure many government agencies rely own to support their general revenues.

🎓 Now anyone can explore machine learning, no coding required http://bit.ly/2Bec3ol

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Machine learning has the potential to help government agencies make better sense of their data but it has required new skills that existing employees do not always have. The rise of frictionless and code-less machine learning systems will help lower the barrier for agencies and existing employees to begin to adopt the technology.

🎫 This New Blockchain Project Gives Homeless New Yorkers A Digital Identity http://bit.ly/2kwuJZB

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Historically, technology has unlocked significant value for those that have had the means of accessing it — that’s why this story of using the blockchain to provide identity to homeless individuals in New York is so powerful. Government agencies should take notice of this use-case and ensure that they continue to focus on digital equity in all new technology initiatives.

📉 The Hidden Player Spurring a Wave of Cheap Consumer Devices: Amazon http://nyti.ms/2kuN1Kx

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: It’s important for government agencies to understand the macro-trends impacting technology adoption — and this was a great article that illustrated the impact Amazon has had on the current wave of inexpensive devices in the market — all of which people are using to interface with government at a level never seen before.

🆓 Google Is Giving Away AI That Can Build Your Genome Sequence http://bit.ly/2BjM3Ia

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: In 1991 it cost $2.7 billion dollars to sequence the first human genome and over the years we’ve seen that exponentially decline to approximately $1,000 per person. Now enter freemium — the ability to have your genome sequenced by AI at no cost — but there’s always a catch, and government agencies will need to deal with how to regulate the use of genetic data in future data privacy conversations.

Read the full article on Medium

Hacking cars, job-stealing robots and a newspaper becomes a software company — This Week’s 10 Reads from a Chief Innovation Officer

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⏱ Watch Thieves Hack Keyless Entry to Steal a Mercedes in Less Than a Minute http://bit.ly/2Bgcv1x

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This video is a good example that demonstrates how the interconnectedness of society will lead to new forms of crime we could never anticipate — such as someone hacking a keyless vehicle to steal it. Local government agencies will be the frontlines of these new battles and it’s important for them to recognize the trends and equip their staff (in this case law enforcement) to handle these new forms of crime.

⌚️ IOTA launches IoT data marketplace, envisions devices autonomously buying and trading information http://bit.ly/2An1IFS

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: There are multiple IoT platforms that are competing to become the new standard in Internet-enabled devices (HomeKit, etc.); unfortunately, their standards are typically wrapped up into hardware — which is why a platform for IoT data instead of platform for devices makes so much sense. In order to realize real value from IoT, government agencies will need to focus bringing data from disparate devices into one place. A streetlight with a dozen sensors doesn’t make your city smarter — the ability to access, analyze and process its data (and other devices) is what does.

☁️ Amazon Focuses on Machine Learning to Beat Cloud Rivals https://bloom.bg/2ipRrSx

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: It’s great to see that cloud infrastructure companies are shifting their focus from optimizing basic infrastructure functions (speed, etc.) into enabling new services through on-demand models (i.e., machine learning or AI-as-a-service). These new cloud applications will enable government agencies to have access to state-of-the-art capabilities on-demand and disruptively priced. No state and local government agency could afford a supercomputer in the past, but they now have the ability to use one in the cloud for pennies on the dollar.

💰 UK Government Launches £20 Million Fund for Gov Tech Startups https://www.gov.uk/government/news/new-support-for-tech-to-boost-public-sector-productivity

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: It’s great to see the spread and maturity of the government technology (gov tech) industry across the globe. From London, England to New York City, New York, gov tech is a growing industry that has enabled entrepreneurs to transform city hall — and the best is yet to come. You can read more about what we are seeing in the market on GovTech Biz.

🔑 Blockchains are poised to kill off passwords, once and for all http://bit.ly/2AxIxcw

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: The blockchain has the potential to disrupt many industries, including government. A foundational element of this disruption will be wrapped up in user identity and will fundamentally flip how we access the Internet — and further eliminating the need for traditional passwords altogether. For government, blockchain can provide a powerful decentralized infrastructure that is resilient and secure as a byproduct. The tech is still in its infancy from an ease of development standpoint, but every day it’s becoming much easier to build on.

Read the full article on Medium

Deep learning eating software, pop-up mesh networks and a blockchain-enabled turkey — This Week’s 10 Reads from a Chief Innovation Office

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I read over 100 articles this week so you don’t have to — Here are the top 10 you should read over the weekend and (new addition!) why they matter for government.

👀 To Understand the Future of Cities, Watch the Curb. Yeah, the Curb http://bit.ly/2ztffMm

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: The curb is where you get picked up by Uber, have your local packages delivered or jump into a Car2Go — and it’s only going to get more important with the rise of new mobility behaviors. Cities are increasingly looking at the curb as an important aspect of the bigger mobility picture and you should too.

💰 Analyzing start-up and investment trends in the mobility ecosystem http://bit.ly/2zbkzjt

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Government agencies need to have an exponential mindset when it comes to how they plan and execute on any capital project. Part of developing an exponential mindset, is understanding the big picture — this article provided a good start if your interested in mobility with an insightful look at the start-up and investment ecosystem that continues to grow.

🍴 Deep Learning is Eating Software http://bit.ly/2mFbJst

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Deep Learning, a subfield of machine learning, is fundamentally changing how we build software. As Pete Warden states in the article, “Instead of writing and maintaining intricate, layered tangles of logic, the [software] developer has to become a teacher, a curator of training data and an analyst of results.” Warden also believes, “in ten years…most software jobs won’t involve programming,” and I agree. For government, deep learning can help connect the dots between different silos of software and data and enable government to extract more impactful insights that are too complex to extract today.

📡 A mesh network spontaneously erupts in the US and helps connect Puerto Rico http://tcrn.ch/2zER64M

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: This is a powerful story of resiliency, the power of people and a clever way to build a network using Bluetooth and a device called the goTenna. As government leaders look to increase resiliency and strengthen disaster recovery plans, they should incorporate the power of their own networks of people as an aspect of that strategy. As we’ve seen from Hurricane Harvey to Puerto Rico, people can identify, fund and implement lifesaving approaches sometimes quicker than government can respond.

🤩 Microsoft unveils special Skype version for freelancers http://bit.ly/2zCW2r5

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Freelancers are task-based contractors (they get a 1099 instead of a W-2 at the end of the year), that are on the rise thanks to Uber, TaskRabbitUpwork and others. Almost anyone today can pickup their phone and become a freelancer for one of these firms, which has blossomed into what is now called the sharing or ‘gig’ economy. These companies provide an early glimpse of the future of work — the rise of task-based work — and it’s becoming such an important driver that Microsoft built an optimized version of Skype just for these new workers to book clients and get paid all on their platform. Government take note, your best employees may not work directly for you in the future — they may be part of the crowd.

🚕 Uber orders 24,000 Volvo XC90s for driverless fleet http://tcrn.ch/2zRQtoP

🏛 Why it Matters for Government: Ordering 24,000 self-driving Volvos is a fairly big bet by Uber ($1.4 billion dollars to be exact) that we will be using self-driving taxis in the not-to-distant future. The self-driving taxis are scheduled to be delivered and on the road between 2019–2021 — so government agencies need to get ready and start to prepare for how self-driving vehicles will impact planning, revenues and much more.

Read the full blogpost at on Medium.